Cruella and her 1960s fashion illustration

Illustrators such as Mouchy and Merle Bassett filled pages of fashion magazines with their strong silhouettes. And perhaps Cruella De Vil would cherish, more than any other villain, being delineated as a fashion sketch in a late 1950s or early 1960s copy of “Woman’s Day” magazine.

Cruella De Vil drawing

Cruella De Vil drawing

I’ve drawn, in my “Where Pictures Shine” style, Kent Melton’s Walt Disney Classics Collection 2006 sculpture “Perfectly Wretched”.

Drawing begins of the WDCC Cruella De Vil figurine

Drawing begins of the WDCC Cruella De Vil figurine

Drawing by Douglas Rickard of WDCC Cruella sculpted by Kent Melton

Drawing by Douglas Rickard of WDCC Cruella sculpted by Kent Melton

Miss De Vil joins the Evil Queen and Maleficent in my series. Each has a solitary color flare; purple for the Queen; green for Maleficent; and a pucker of red for Cruella’s lipstick and lining of that coat.

Red coat lining of charcoal Cruella

Red coat lining of charcoal Cruella

Cruella De Vil as a 1960s magazine fashion sketch

Cruella De Vil as a 1960s magazine fashion sketch

With “One Hundred and One Dalmatians” being released in 1961 there’s something of course 1960s, I hope, about that mix of red oil pastel I used in my drawing. Perhaps it could almost be a pigment of Winsor and Newton paint those fashion illustrators may have worked with. The Walt Disney film was styled by Walter Peregoy who too, used strong lines not dissimilar to those of the magazine fashion illustrators. The outlines of table lamps to buildings and everything else in the movie’s background art, you will notice, stylishly strays from those objects’ blocks of color because see-through animation cels of Walter Peregoy’s black line work went over his painted color shapes.

Where Pictures Shine - Cruella De Vil by Douglas Rickard

Where Pictures Shine – Cruella De Vil by Douglas Rickard

So with these art deco lines in my drawing, similar to those used throughout the ‘50s and ‘60s, Cruella really is the perfect fit for my set of worked in, charcoal art. Although my “Where Pictures Shine” style, is different again. The oil pastel was applied to one empty area, up to, and against the black lines. And there are no lines wandering over color blocks because no dusty charcoal stick can make any real mark through any swathe of oil pastel.

So wherever you decide to display my still-life of the WDCC piece; which I believe, like Cruella is something quite unique; that devilish red should shine out, especially in a Hand Embellished version (below), of this rather ‘1960s fashion illustration’ of Anita’s old school chum.

Cruella De Vil Hand Embellished Bespoke Fine Art Print

Cruella De Vil Hand Embellished Bespoke Fine Art Print

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Maleficent – a sculpture and drawing, Angelina in the flesh, the movie, props and costumes

Creating the new, (such as the Disney “Maleficent” movie, or my own drawing of that “Evil Enchantress”) while preserving the essence of the old. I used heavy, black charcoal strokes and just four types of green in my latest “Where Pictures Shine” release, a Numbered Limited Edition of 24.

Four Caran d'Ache Neopastel colors used in Maleficent art by Douglas Rickard

Four Caran d’Ache Neopastel colors used in Maleficent art by Douglas Rickard

Drawing Maleficent by Douglas Rickard

Drawing Maleficent by Douglas Rickard

Walt Disney Classics Collection Maleficent figurine by Kent Melton

Walt Disney Classics Collection Maleficent figurine by Kent Melton

I think that I have captured not only Kent Melton’s 1999 Walt Disney Classic Collection 10” piece with this minimalist portrait; but also I hope, the original Marc Davis “Sleeping Beauty” animated character, which the sculpture brought from two dimensions to three, before I brought it back again, to a line drawing.

Maleficent Numbered Limited Edition Art by Douglas Rickard

Maleficent Numbered Limited Edition Art by Douglas Rickard

Maleficent art

Maleficent art

In “Maleficent” Angelina Jolie channels the 1950s movie villainess’ ink and paint, especially when she smiles. She actually gave me a wave you know, (along with a dozen others) on her way in for a “Maleficent” costume event at Kensington Palace. Fortunately I saw that exhibit later… (outside royal grounds).

The palace scenery for me, in “Maleficent” was even more breathtaking than the magical moors. Modernist colors in “Sleeping Beauty” bled out from those stylized characters in the medieval Walt Disney story. In “Maleficent,” the richest, seemingly ancient and long-lost colors surround you in three dimensions, literally, depending upon which screening you choose.

“Maleficent” wonders why King Stefan and even Flora, Fauna and Merryweather already knew the uninvited fairy would be bad news. It’s fascinating to trek into what could have been their pasts. But as even Angelina Jolie said “there is not just simply good and bad,” I wished the good weren’t painted quite so simply bad in this story.

The actors with their amazing costumes, even the crowds in the castle halls reminded me of realistic illustrations of fairy tales by Eric Winter in original British Ladybird books; a delight to behold. But I enjoyed the live-action re-interpreting of, and nods to, the original “Sleeping Beauty” animated movie most, whether it be a cottage, a lopsided cake or an edge of your seat Christening exchange.

Maleficent Aurora's cradle

Maleficent Aurora’s cradle

Ladybird book Well Loved Tales Sleeping Beauty retold by Vera Southgate, Eric Winter illustrations

Ladybird book Well Loved Tales Sleeping Beauty retold by Vera Southgate, Eric Winter illustrations

Maleficent Aurora Costume and the Spinning Wheel

Maleficent Aurora Costume and the Spinning Wheel

Maleficent Spinning Wheel

Maleficent Spinning Wheel

Maleficent Horns Headdress

Maleficent Horns Headdress