Cruella and her 1960s fashion illustration

Illustrators such as Mouchy and Merle Bassett filled pages of fashion magazines with their strong silhouettes. And perhaps Cruella De Vil would cherish, more than any other villain, being delineated as a fashion sketch in a late 1950s or early 1960s copy of “Woman’s Day” magazine.

Cruella De Vil drawing

Cruella De Vil drawing

I’ve drawn, in my “Where Pictures Shine” style, Kent Melton’s Walt Disney Classics Collection 2006 sculpture “Perfectly Wretched”.

Drawing begins of the WDCC Cruella De Vil figurine

Drawing begins of the WDCC Cruella De Vil figurine

Drawing by Douglas Rickard of WDCC Cruella sculpted by Kent Melton

Drawing by Douglas Rickard of WDCC Cruella sculpted by Kent Melton

Miss De Vil joins the Evil Queen and Maleficent in my series. Each has a solitary color flare; purple for the Queen; green for Maleficent; and a pucker of red for Cruella’s lipstick and lining of that coat.

Red coat lining of charcoal Cruella

Red coat lining of charcoal Cruella

Cruella De Vil as a 1960s magazine fashion sketch

Cruella De Vil as a 1960s magazine fashion sketch

With “One Hundred and One Dalmatians” being released in 1961 there’s something of course 1960s, I hope, about that mix of red oil pastel I used in my drawing. Perhaps it could almost be a pigment of Winsor and Newton paint those fashion illustrators may have worked with. The Walt Disney film was styled by Walter Peregoy who too, used strong lines not dissimilar to those of the magazine fashion illustrators. The outlines of table lamps to buildings and everything else in the movie’s background art, you will notice, stylishly strays from those objects’ blocks of color because see-through animation cels of Walter Peregoy’s black line work went over his painted color shapes.

Where Pictures Shine - Cruella De Vil by Douglas Rickard

Where Pictures Shine – Cruella De Vil by Douglas Rickard

So with these art deco lines in my drawing, similar to those used throughout the ‘50s and ‘60s, Cruella really is the perfect fit for my set of worked in, charcoal art. Although my “Where Pictures Shine” style, is different again. The oil pastel was applied to one empty area, up to, and against the black lines. And there are no lines wandering over color blocks because no dusty charcoal stick can make any real mark through any swathe of oil pastel.

So wherever you decide to display my still-life of the WDCC piece; which I believe, like Cruella is something quite unique; that devilish red should shine out, especially in a Hand Embellished version (below), of this rather ‘1960s fashion illustration’ of Anita’s old school chum.

Cruella De Vil Hand Embellished Bespoke Fine Art Print

Cruella De Vil Hand Embellished Bespoke Fine Art Print

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